The Excel DOLLARFR Function

Fractional Dollar Values

The Excel Dollarfr and Dollarde functions are designed for working with security prices, which are often quoted as fractional values.

Some examples are given below:

fractional notationfractiondecimal
1.01 (denominator 16)1 1/161.0625
1.1 (denominator 16)1 10/161.625
1.03 (denominator 32)1 3/321.09375
1.3 (denominator 32)1 30/321.9375
1.12 (denominator 32)1 12/321.375
Related Function:
DOLLARDE

Basic Description

The Excel Dollarfr function converts a dollar value in decimal notation, into a dollar value that is expressed in fractional notation.

The syntax of the function is:

DOLLARFR( decimal_dollar, fraction )

Where the arguments are as follows:

decimal_dollar-The dollar value, expressed as a decimal.
fraction-

The denominator for the returned fractional value.

(Should be supplied as an integer, but if a decimal value is supplied, Excel will truncate this to an integer).


Excel Dollarfr Function Examples

The following spreadsheet shows the Excel Dollarfr function, used to convert five decimal prices into fractional notation.

 Formulas:
 AB
1=DOLLARFR( 1.0625, 16 ) - equal to 1 + 1/16
2=DOLLARFR( 1.625, 16 ) - equal to 1 + 10/16
3=DOLLARFR( 1.09375, 32 ) - equal to 1 + 3/32
4=DOLLARFR( 1.9375, 32 ) - equal to 1 + 30/32
5=DOLLARFR( 1.375, 32 ) - equal to 1 + 12/32
 Results:
 AB
11.01 - equal to 1 + 1/16
21.1 - equal to 1 + 10/16
31.03 - equal to 1 + 3/32
41.3 - equal to 1 + 30/32
51.12 - equal to 1 + 12/32

For further examples of the Excel Dollarfr function, see the Microsoft Office website.


Dollarfr Function Errors

If you get an error from the Dollarfr function, this is likely to be one of the following:

Common Errors
#NUM!-Occurs if the supplied fraction argument is < 0.
#DIV/0!-Occurs if the supplied fraction argument = 0.
#VALUE!-Occurs if either of the supplied arguments is non-numeric.